Five Years After Troy Davis Execution: The Problem Remains

I Am Troy Davis was published on the anniversary of his execution in 2013. (Cover under copyright used to raise awareness of the book).

I Am Troy Davis was published on the anniversary of his execution in 2013. (Cover under copyright used to raise awareness of the book).

Troy Anthony Davis was executed five years ago in America among international controversy for the slaying of a police officer.

There was controversy over whether there was enough evidence to convict him.  Many people, including Former FBI Director William Sessions, said there was not. And there was controversy over whether or not the death penalty was appropriate to a free nation in the 21st century.  Put a man in jail, and if you made a mistake you can release him. Kill him and it’s over.

Most witnesses against him recanted; one of the two remaining allegedly said he, not Davis, was the killer of police officer Mark MacPhail in Savannah, Georgia, in 1991.

The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, passed in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing, made it much more difficult for a convicted person to get appeals.  Proponents claim it makes it harder for the guilty to postpone their execution with appeals; opponents claim it makes it harder for the innocent to postpone their execution and to show their innocence.

It largely comes down to a matter of priorities over life: would we rather let the guilty postpone their death, or the innocent be killed?

 

Dangerous Dogs, Untrained Handlers, Native Americans

democracy_now_jonni_joyce_dog_attack_native_american_pipeline_protestors

Image of video of dog attack incident and interview with Jonni Joyce.

Dangerous Dogs, Untrained Handlers, Native Americans clash in protest over pipeline.There’s a big debate about a pipeline going through Amerind land where it could impact on both sacred ground and the availability of clean water. A federal judge has temporarily halted some construction. But I’d like to focus on the dogs brought in to “handle” the peaceful protest.

I’m not an expert in this kind of dog training like Jonni Joyce, who is interviewed in the video by Democracy Now. But I am familiar with it as a journalist who covered crime for many years and I have worked with animals including dogs for quite a few years. It’s obvious to me in this video that the dogs, the dog handlers, or both have not been properly trained. That is completely inappropriate and is, as can be seen in the video, dangerous. Several people and apparently a horse were bit.  I’m sure heads are going to roll because of this.

Here’s a shorter Facebook version of the video.

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the entire family.

 

Humans are Sheep–Stand with the Flock?

Hidden camera social experiment (posted by Anonymous)

Hidden camera social experiment (posted by Anonymous)

A small social experiment–would you stand at a buzzer just because everybody else does?

In “free” societies, it’s often used as an insult to call people “sheep.”  We like to say, “Do your own thing,” and “Be yourself,” and “Don’t do that just because your friends do.”

But Homo sapiens are a social species. Most of us do go along with the crowd, even if we don’t know why. Even the most independent of us doesn’t desire to be ostracized from our own society.

So would you stand up?

Link is www.facebook.com/anonews.co/videos/vb.997108126967413/1313784798633076/?type=2&theater