Reverend Loveshade and Ms. M.C. and Baby Three


Big three-year-old sister holding newborn baby brother.

All names in this entry are Discordian names.

It’s baby number three! Ms. M.C. gave birth to Cobbraven at 19.54 UTC Tuesday, 26 Dec. 2017. Cobbraven weighed in at 3,855 grams (8.5 lbs.) and was 51.8 cm long (20.4 inches).  Mommy and Baby are doing great.  Daddy, who worried tremendously over the birth of baby one, and a lot over baby two, has almost gotten used to Ms. M.C. giving birth.  Almost. Older sisters Twinkleton and Wunderkätzchen are ready, willing, and able to help their new brother. The family didn’t get the same midwife as for their first two offspring, but got great help from Nurse Aislebeth. Once again, Untroubled Teen V, Ms. MC’s 18-year-old sister, helped with the birth which was at Roseneteeth Commune. UTV, who plans to become a midwife in four years or so, has already helped at all three of the couple’s births (starting when age 12) and several other births.

Congratulations to the family!

תהלה הרץ shot the photo which is under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

End of the Year Letter 2017

xmas_flowerxmas_flower2To see the full graphics and the Christmas poem described in this letter, check the attachments at the bottom.

Say kids, what time is it? It’s End of the Year Letter time!

I had some guests this year. They included:

1) some welcome out-of-state visitors for the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love
2) a neighbor’s heifer (a young cow) who decided the grass was greener on my side so loved spending the night here while her “parents” were out of town
3) some pretty white wildflowers that when I touched them lovingly gave me a rash
4) some fire ants that loved biting my feet
5) some busy bees that loved being busy inside of my bird feeder
6) an opossum (“possum”) lying by the side of the house that I thought was dead–until I remembered they love “playing possum”
7) and an unwelcome but clever wild mouse that loved the food he took from the shelf, two live traps, and the cats without getting caught. (I did catch him in the third trap, two cardboard tubes I stuck together with peanut butter inside, although to keep him from escaping again I had to cover the tube hole on each end with my bare hands).

My Mom got her formerly fibrillating heart rebooted which helped her a lot.

The year wasn’t without bad news. I lost an uncle, a neighbor’s house burned down, and another neighbor’s house exploded. And I had to file several DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) claims which fortunately worked, but then my computer went kaput.

I got my weight back down, and am weighing helping design curriculum for Abrahamic religions for a religious studies series. I’m finally entering the 21st century by switching my photography from film to digital. I partially built a barn floor, and am working on a special project, writing, editing, and doing graphic design for publications (I created the 21st Centuryesque font used in the heading, and graphics and border of this here letter).

Back to the 20th century, I’ve included the very first piece I ever professionally published, a Christmas poem I wrote when I was 16 years old. Keep in mind I wrote it when I was 16 years old.

Have a Great Christmas, Happy Kwanzaa, Merry Chanukah, Wonderful Yule, Fine Winter/ Summer Solstice, Terrific New Year!

End of the Year Letter 2017 and Christmas poem

End of the Year Letter 2017 _AL_ digital

What is Christmas (AL)

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

The Second Amendment is Dead

Image from

Image from

The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, born 226 years ago today, is dead.  Defunct.  And it has been dead for a long time.

Many of you will say it’s not dead.  It’s never been revoked, it’s still in the Constitution, and it’s still the law.  And I would agree.  But as it existed originally, and from a practical point of view, it’s deceased.

The Second Amendment harkens back to the American Declaration of Independence.  No less that President Abraham Lincoln believed that the Constitution should be interpreted through the Declaration’s principles, according to Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution by historian James M. McPherson.  And that says it is “the Right of the People to alter or abolish” a despotic government. “It is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.” It is “the Right of the People to alter or abolish it.”

To throw off a hostile government, and to provide guards for the future, means having and using arms.  The right to bear arms goes back much further, back 100 years to the English Bill of Rights of 1689.  And in the 21st century in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), the Supreme Court proclaimed the right to bear arms was “clearly an individual right, having nothing whatsoever to do with service in the militia.”

While the nation’s founders did not state a constitutional right of the people to “throw off such Government” once they founded a government, they did continue the tradition of giving people, including individuals, the right to bear arms.  In 1791, the Second Amendment passed which says, “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

So why do I say the Second Amendment is dead?  At its acceptance, and by the traditions that preceded it, it gave people the right to bear arms against a government.  From a practical point of view, that means people having arms that could be used to defeat a nation.

In 1791, this was entirely practical.  A person of relatively modest means could buy a Kentucky long rifle, then arguably the most effective weapon in existence.  (I’ll leave it to munitions experts to debate on whether a field gun or something else was most effective, but in any case, a person could buy one).  For something larger, you and your associates could buy and use a real, deadly cannon like members of private groups, including the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, used.

But things have changed, radically.  There was the Civil War’s Gatling gun, which was nearly an automatic weapon; and the 1880s Maxim gun, which was.  These weapons were not readily available, and were very expensive.  The Second Amendment, in its original meaning as interpreted through the Declaration of Independence, was dying.

In today’s world, it’s all over.  None of us can go to our local gun shop and pick up a arsenal of thermonuclear weapons.  And you can’t go to Walmart to get yourself a nuclear submarine and an armed aircraft carrier.  They’re too expensive, and too illegal.  That’s what someone in the modern world would realistically need to “throw off such Government.”  Thus, by its original meaning, the Second Amendment is dead.

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.