Babies Can Consent: 16-Year-Olds Can’t

 

How can babies be old enough to give consent and teenagers aren’t?

In some parts of Australia, 15 year olds aren’t old enough to give consent to another person doing things with their genitals. In other parts, 16 year olds aren’t old enough.  In some cases, neither are 17 year olds.

But babies are? A sex expert is recommending parents don’t change their infant’s diapers until the baby gives permission.

Sexuality expert says parents should ask for consent to change a baby’s diaper

An opinion of a member or associate of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.
Photo of female teenager by Tyfox is released into the public domain.  Photo of newborn is by Dianakcline and is under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Lowlife Slimeball Salacious Oligarch Kakistocracy

 

American flag with today’s trending words.

Merriam-Webster (to which I, ahem, made extremely small contributions) has words Trending Now on its website.  One of the foremost dictionary producers in English language history, it works not to set trends, but to report them.

In today’s political and social climate, what were the five top recent trending words in the English language?

  1. lowlife ‘a person of low moral character’
  2. kakistocracy ‘government by the worst people’
  3. slimeball ‘a morally repulsive or odious person’
  4. salacious ‘arousing or appealing to sexual desire’
  5. oligarch ‘government in which a small group exercises control’

Welcome to today’s America.
Merriam-Webster.com

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

Original flag image by Dawn Hudson was released into the public domain; our version here with Merriam-Webster’s Trending Now words we also release.

Chinese Zoo Visitors Kill Kangaroos

Red Kangaroo, photo taken at Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo, Australia (photo by Rileypie).

If you had any doubt that zoos in China are often terrible, you should have no doubt now.

Visitors wanted some kangaroos to hop for their entertainment. When they didn’t, the visitors threw rocks at them. One helpless kangaroo was injured, another died.

Should we stone an animal to death because it won’t dance?

Chinese kill zoo kangaroo

An opinion by a member or associate of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

Donald Trump is The Best at Everything

How many times have you heard Donald Trump brag about how terrific he is? Here’s more.

Donald Trump Can’t Stop Congratulating Himself

Trump, quite simply, is the best at everything. Believe him.

Posted by The Trumpster Fire by HuffPost on Wednesday, February 28, 2018

An opinion of a member or associate of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

The image of Donald Trump was identified by a news service as being in the public domain, but did not identify the photographer.

School Says Girls Can’t Say No

Girls were not allowed to choose who they danced with at a school dance. (This photo is a substitute for the original which was removed by the publisher; this photo does not depict the school; see details below).

A Utah girl told her mother she couldn’t refuse if a boy asked her to dance at a Valentine’s Day event at her school. The mother complained to her Kanesville Elementary school principal because telling a sixth grade girl she couldn’t say no to a boy is a terrible message. The principal said that’s the policy, and the preteen girl had to do what the boys wanted.

It applies to both boys and girls. What happens if they say no, will they be punished? None of the preteens can say no. Is this 2018 or 1958?

Schools decision to refuse girls right to say no if boys ask them to dance, challenged by pupil’s parent

Photo source.
An opinion of a family member of associate of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

White Evangelical Christian Hypocrisy

Donald Trump and Barack Obama.  How you speak about them tells more about you than it does about them.  And you may not like what people are seeing.

If you want to skip my introduction, you can go and read John Pavlovitz’s editorial White Evangelicals, This is Why People Are Through With You.

If there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s hypocrisy.  If you recall, Jesus of Nazareth didn’t tolerate it either.  And right now, America is rampant with it.

This isn’t just about Donald Trump and Barack Obama.  This isn’t just about politics.  It’s about fundamental Christian values.  To understand where I’m coming from, you need to understand where I came from.

I was raised in church.  For churches, I was a child acolyte, child/teen/adult choir member, janitor, website and business card designer, Bible school worker, assistant production director, production director, young adult group leader, adult Sunday school teacher, communion server, bylaws reviser, and administrative board member.

I am classified as Caucasian, and I voted in the last presidential primary as Republican.

With that in mind, I remember how Jesus loved and helped sinners, but spoke very, very strongly against religious hypocrisy.  Like what is happening in America right now.

Now please read John Pavlovitz’s editorial White Evangelicals, This is Why People Are Through With You.  It says what I would say if John hadn’t already said it very, very well.

An opinion of an individual members of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

Donald Trump Lies

“I’m not gonna play much golf, because there’s a lot of work to be done.” –Donald Trump

All right, so the title of this entry is hardly ground-breaking.  Even supporters of Donald Trump say he lies (and may justify it by saying all politicians lie and they don’t care).

But comparing the number and type of Trump’s documented lies to those of hundreds of people in studies reveal a couple of startling things.  Social scientist

For one thing, he apparently lies much more often than the average person.  For another, Trump’s lies are rarely made to avoid hurting someone’s feelings, like many of us do (“Why yes, I really do like your new, whatever-it-is you’re wearing.”)  Instead, Donald Trump’s lies are often the opposite: insulting and hurtful.  He lies to insult people much, much more often than almost all of the rest of us. In fact, according to records of his public comments, his lies are 10 times more likely to be malicious.

Come to think of it, having listened to Trump speak, maybe that isn’t too surprising either.

I study liars. I’ve never seen one like President Trump.
Voter’s don’t seem to care whether candidates tell the truth

Linked photo is listed as REUTERS/David Moir

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

The Second Amendment is Dead

Image from http://awselby.com/?p=331

Image from http://awselby.com/?p=331

The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, born 226 years ago today, is dead.  Defunct.  And it has been dead for a long time.

Many of you will say it’s not dead.  It’s never been revoked, it’s still in the Constitution, and it’s still the law.  And I would agree.  But as it existed originally, and from a practical point of view, it’s deceased.

The Second Amendment harkens back to the American Declaration of Independence.  No less that President Abraham Lincoln believed that the Constitution should be interpreted through the Declaration’s principles, according to Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution by historian James M. McPherson.  And that says it is “the Right of the People to alter or abolish” a despotic government. “It is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.” It is “the Right of the People to alter or abolish it.”

To throw off a hostile government, and to provide guards for the future, means having and using arms.  The right to bear arms goes back much further, back 100 years to the English Bill of Rights of 1689.  And in the 21st century in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), the Supreme Court proclaimed the right to bear arms was “clearly an individual right, having nothing whatsoever to do with service in the militia.”

While the nation’s founders did not state a constitutional right of the people to “throw off such Government” once they founded a government, they did continue the tradition of giving people, including individuals, the right to bear arms.  In 1791, the Second Amendment passed which says, “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

So why do I say the Second Amendment is dead?  At its acceptance, and by the traditions that preceded it, it gave people the right to bear arms against a government.  From a practical point of view, that means people having arms that could be used to defeat a nation.

In 1791, this was entirely practical.  A person of relatively modest means could buy a Kentucky long rifle, then arguably the most effective weapon in existence.  (I’ll leave it to munitions experts to debate on whether a field gun or something else was most effective, but in any case, a person could buy one).  For something larger, you and your associates could buy and use a real, deadly cannon like members of private groups, including the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, used.

But things have changed, radically.  There was the Civil War’s Gatling gun, which was nearly an automatic weapon; and the 1880s Maxim gun, which was.  These weapons were not readily available, and were very expensive.  The Second Amendment, in its original meaning as interpreted through the Declaration of Independence, was dying.

In today’s world, it’s all over.  None of us can go to our local gun shop and pick up a arsenal of thermonuclear weapons.  And you can’t go to Walmart to get yourself a nuclear submarine and an armed aircraft carrier.  They’re too expensive, and too illegal.  That’s what someone in the modern world would realistically need to “throw off such Government.”  Thus, by its original meaning, the Second Amendment is dead.

An opinion of an individual member of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the whole family.

Presidents v. The Constitution

Then President Barack Obama and then President Elect Donald Trump (Pete Souza).

Then President Barack Obama and then President Elect Donald Trump (Pete Souza).

We live in a political era in which several Americans presidents in a row have been severely criticized, often with claims they violated the U.S. Constitution, and hit with calls for their removal.  The current one, Donald Trump, is certainly no exception.

Just in the last few days, a senator claimed President Trump had “castrated” the Secretary of State; Trump named a woman who denies climate change and who calls wind and solar power parasitic to be energy advisor; Trump’s campaign has been subpoenaed over sexual assault charges; and U.S. states are suing over Trump’s move to destroy the Affordable Care Act.

While the numbers of such battles and accusations is very high right now, battles between the president and constitutionalists is nothing new.  To put a perspective on what’s happening now, it may be time to reflect on battles that happened before Donald Trump or Barack Obama before him were elected to America’s highest office.

Even back then, Andrew P. Napolitano noted in The Wall Street Journal that Most Presidents Ignore the Constitution.

JANUS-Tête-à-Tête photo by Pete Souza. This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

The War is Over

Exhibit in the Wisconsin Veterans Museum, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Photo, taken by Daderot, released into the public domain.

Confederate flag exhibit in the Wisconsin Veterans Museum, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Photo, taken by Daderot, released into the public domain.

Little known historical fact: the American Civil War, aka the War Between the States, is over.  It ended in 1865.

I say that because it appears many people are still trying to fight that war.

I remember years ago visiting the capitol of Alabama in Montgomery.  I was astonished to see both the flag of the United States of America, and the flag of the Confederate States of America, flying above the capitol building.

It was not that I had anything against the flag of the Confederacy being at the capitol.  It is a part of Alabama’s history.  Many brave and noble people lost their properties and their lives fighting for their homes, for Alabama, and for their view of America.  The war, in many ways the most costly in American history, should not be forgotten.  The Confederacy should not be forgotten, nor should its flags.  I would have been perfectly happy seeing the flag openly displayed inside the capitol building.

But Alabama has not been part of the Confederacy since 1865.  Neither has Texas.  Texas has been under the flags of six different nations, including itself.  Those fly over Six Flags amusement parks, as well they should.  But not over the capitol, any more than the capitol of California should fly the flag of Mexico.  Nor should Washington D.C. proclaim allegiance to the Nacotchtank.  They inhabited the land long before Captain John Smith discovered them at the beginning of the 17th century, and even longer before it became the capital of America.  But the flag that flies over the center of government should represent that government and its allegiance, not allegiance to another nation.

We’re now having a battle over statues of the Confederacy.  Again, I have no problem with the statutes themselves, even after I learned there were more erected during the assertion of Jim Crow laws over “negros” than at any other time.

But if they’re displayed, they should be displayed as a symbol of American history.  They should not be a sign of its allegiance.

An opinion of an individual member or associate of The Loveshade Family does not necessarily reflect the views of the entire family.